Baboon
Baboon
The baboon, of all the primates in East Africa, most frequently interacts with people. Apart from humans, baboons are the most adaptable of the ground-dwelling primates and live in a wide variety of habitats. Intelligent and crafty, they can be agricultural pests, so they are treated as vermin rather than wildlife.

Baboons spend most of their day time foraging on the ground, at night they nest in trees or on cliffs. Males are normally twice the size of female, powerfully built with long canines. Baboons are very social animals, moving and living in large troops and can defend themselves once provocked. The troop usually consists of seven to eight males and approximately twice as many females plus their young. These family units of females, juveniles and infants form the stable core of a troop, with a ranking system that elevates certain females as leaders. A troop's home range is well-defined but does not appear to have territorial borders. It often overlaps with the range of other baboons, but the troops seem to avoid meeting one another.

When they begin to mature, males leave their natal troops and move in and out of other troops. Frequent fights break out to determine dominance over access to females or meat. The ranking of these males constantly changes during this period.

Males are accepted into new troops slowly, usually by developing "friendships" with different females around the edge of a troop. They often help to defend a female and her offspring

Source of information:Collins Guide to African Wildlife and African Wildlife Foundation Website



Magic Safaris™ is a Trade Mark of Concord International Travel Bureau Ltd. - Development and Copyright © Spiritus bvba